Photographer Self Portraits

Many photographers I have met, including me, dislike having their photograph taken. I always say I prefer being on the other side of the lens and make a joke about photographs stealing your soul which often works. I remember the first Photography Awards I attended in London, at least 50% of the photographers shambled up to the stage, some scowling and looking incredibly nervous, grimaced when having their picture taken by the press. I did exactly the same although in reality I was elated, over the moon that I had won an award. As soon as I was off the stage I wore a big grin for days.

So what makes us react like this? Is it because the photographer is usually in control of the picture making process and doesn’t like relinquishing it?

Are self- portraits just a posh name for Selfies?

Here are three of my self portraits:

Self portrait of Paul Biddle surrealist photographer
Self portrait of Paul Biddle and Jackdaw
self portrait of Paul Biddle as The Collected rather than the Collector
Self portrait by Paul Biddle.He has placed his own head inside a bell jar as an exhibit like in his Cabinet of Curiosity series. The Collector becomes the Collected.
A self portrait of Paul Biddle surrealist photographer with a locust perched on his opticians glasses with enigmatic alphabet letters throughout the image.Sepia print.
Self- Portrait with Locust and Letters

Many artists have made self-portraits – look at the Vasari Corridor in Florence, Italy. It’s an elevated closed corridor which connects the Palazzo Vecchio with the Palazzo Pitti, designed by Giorgio Vasari for Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici in 1565 and it has artist self portraits lining it’s walls.


Author: PaulBlog6

The fine art photography of Paul Biddle displays a highly original and creative approach to image making. He is an award winning surrealist photographer whose work has gained the respect of his contemporaries for creating imaginative and playful pictures of the highest technical standards. Many are shot and composed "in camera" in the studio. These images are sometimes inspired by found objects from nature or junk shops or start with a drawing and then a search to find objects to fit the idea. They are then brought to life through his exquisite capturing of light, form, surface and space and his thought provoking juxtapositions. Paul's other way of working is to use objects that he photographs in museums and other places which he then assembles using digital compositing techniques in Photoshop. His passion is for making images: photography is the medium he works with and he believes in understanding the technique so that it becomes transparent and lets the image shine through.

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